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Clinical Epidemiology

February 2, 2018
An editorial from an influential source discussing the recent robust results of the CASTLE-AF RCT trial. It is likely that interventions for atrial fibrillation will be boosted by these results, in terms of insurance, industry, and clinical guideline support.
January 26, 2018
A clear message (although no causation is proven) regarding an important patient-centered research question, going bravely against the tide.
January 24, 2018
A well executed study on an important problem in cardiac surgery that merits careful reading, as no one-sentence conclusion can be adequately gleaned.
January 8, 2018
A very brief editorial on frailty as a risk factor. In the time of weighing transcatheter interventions versus variable access surgical options, quantifying this physiological concept is of major importance for the cardiac teams and, importantly, the autonomy of the patient.
January 3, 2018
Video and a readable digest of a talk in a Harvard meeting, especially interesting in its scepticism on prevention.
December 21, 2017
Interesting to read the mortality and renal morbidity of PCI after serious MI. The choice of dual primary outcome may have been an afterhought....
August 21, 2017
An editorial on what will be soon required from papers sent to the Circulation group of periodicals, and probably soon to all reputable biomedical journals. Bolli advances that the internal and external validity of manuscripts has space for improvement!
May 22, 2017
A surprisingly readable Australasian manuscript on risk prediction models for cardiac surgery. Interesting that the class of dyspnoea was not captured in 5.28% of the operated patients.
May 12, 2017
A short and readable commentary on monoclonal antibodies and dyslipidaemias, particularly on FOURIER,  SPIRE and ODYSSEY trials
May 11, 2017
I was moved by this editorial on global health matters in a daily British newspaper by an  academic medical  colleague,  written in response to anticipated changes in the leadership of the  World Health Organisation. It is perhaps time for us surgeons to augment our administrative participation in global healthcare. 

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