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Ethics Portal

October 11, 2017
Filmed at the 2017 Annual STS Meeting in Houston, Texas, Dr Robert Sade moderates a debate on the appropriate course of care in the fictional case of a child who cannot be weaned from bypass following heart surgery.
August 18, 2016
In a discussion filmed at the 2016 STS Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, a group of experts discuss the ethics of testing new medical devices in developing countries.
June 17, 2015
Robert Sade moderates a debate with Richard Ohye and James Jaggers regarding the performance of surgery by cardiothoracic surgery residents.
June 12, 2015
Dr. Robert Sade has made it his personal mission to educate surgeons regarding ethics and to help truly establish the field of surgical ethics. The Ethics of Surgery: Conflicts and Controversies represents the latest of his efforts.
March 13, 2007
To be reading this, you either already are or are on the way to becoming a cardiothoracic surgeon. Career choice is no longer an issue. The important concern going forward on your career pathway is the quality of your life, both in its professional and personal aspects.
July 25, 2005
I stood about six feet from the radiant warming bed, behind the nurses and residents who were crowded around, each playing a role in the drama reenacted from time to time in this intensive care unit. They were resuscitating a neonate in cardiopulmonary arrest.
July 15, 2005
Live telecasts of surgery are on a dramatic rise. We are spammed daily with invitations to peer over the shoulders of master technicians, to learn nuances of operative technique and, in some, to even ask questions during the procedure.
October 16, 2002
As members of our cardiothoracic surgical specialty are subjected to an increasing frequency and variety of stresses, ethical considerations are assuming a more prominent role in everyday practice. Frustrated by the ever-changing procedural and financial restrictions of Medicare and managed care; by the complexities of business arrangements with partners, competitors, referring physicians and hospitals; by the inducements to utilize new drugs, devices and protocols; by the unrelenting pressure to lower morbidity and expected/ observed mortality rates; by shortening hospital lengths of stays and constraining hospital costs, today's surgeons are experiencing difficulties in avoiding conflicts of interest or obligation. Consequently, there is added responsibility to function as moral fiduciaries and patient advocates, protecting and promoting the patients' best interes